Soma Nature

Reading Time: 2-3 Minutes – SOMA NATURE

Just like the natural world around me, my body, in a sense, has a “Mother Nature.”

Let that sink in and simmer for a moment.

I call It “Soma Nature.”

Soma Nature is a personification of my body’s nature that focuses on the life-giving, life-preserving, and nurturing aspects of my body by embodying it in the form of a parental figure.

It has become clear that my body has a level of intelligence and set of operating instructions that it uses without any intervention on my part that I have no access to. I know that I can interfere with those processes by something as simple as eating poorly to a certain degree. But even then, I can only go so far before good old Soma Nature takes back control.

This is often referred to as an auto-immune disorder which is a slight misnomer because our body doesn’t attack itself. It isn’t attacking you but trying to correct an error in your body, and that level of detoxification is never comfortable and sometimes downright painful. It is precisely that mechanism of action being misinterpreting as an attack when it is not. If the irritating factor is removed, the auto-immune disorder typically ceases to function and stops being needed as a meaningful biological process. Even cancer under the right conditions has been observed to heal spontaneously.

Not sure yet why I connected these two concepts, but it seems like a useful tool for understanding how our body functions.

What do you think?


Michael J. Loomis | Editor at Chew Digest | Scribe at Terrain Wiki

Short Essay: The Creators Hour Circa 1984

The Creators Hour…Circa 1984

Often times when I wake up in the middle of the night I find myself extremely creative and sometimes an idea manifests itself. Some times it is something related to something I was studying the day before, other times whole cloth fiction. This morning’s creator’s hour was a little of both. Something from the mind of Ray Bradbury or George Orwell. Good times…8)

I thought I would share it with you.

People die from toxic shock for many reasons. It is considered a normal part of the human condition. And the seasonal flu. So what if someone wanted to profit off of something that they knew was coming because we human creatures of habit tend to habituate…8)

What if they saw a pattern of purchasing and dietary behaviors followed by expected disease pathologies and an opportunity for narrative flare. All of those discount tracking cards on our keychains for our discounts. Our order history on Amazon.

What if they are just putting a collective name on this expected phenomenon because it is much more significant and widespread of a species level toxic environment cleansing event that they knew was coming down the pike? It’s not like they don’t know everything we are eating. We sold it to them for 10% off our grocery bill.

Mother nature does clean house. Maybe we humans as a species are collectively sick this time around, like a tank full of fish.

Think of it like this. Humans as a race are a distinct body of water here on earth. We all roughly contain the same tissue fluids, plasma and lymph with pretty much identical components just wrapped in separate lipid bilayer skins. 60% of us is water. We as a human whole are a giant ocean of mostly independent water balloons.

When a fish tank(body of water) becomes toxic you don’t just pull out a cup of water at a time, treat it, put it back and repeat. No, that would be silly and never solve anything, you remove 50-75% so as to water down the excess toxins with the addition of fresh water.

Is it possible mother nature treats us the same way? Like a community body of water? Unfortunately, some may be so filled with toxin that they wont survive the detoxification event.

How does that sound? I just made that all up…8)


Originally posted on my blog, www.michaeljloomis.com

What is Underhydration?

Have you ever heard the word euhydration?

Noun. euhydration (uncountable) (medicine) Normal level of hydration; absence of hyperhydration or dehydration.-euhydration – Wiktionary

Even though dehydration describes the state of body water deficit, some scientists have suggested that dehydration refers to the process of losing water, while hypohydration is the state of water deficit, and rehydration is the process of gaining water from a hypohydrated state towards euhydration.


Michael J. Loomis | Editor at Chew Digest | Scribe at Terrain Wiki

Hydration, dehydration, underhydration, optimal hydration: are we barking up the wrong tree?

Stavros Kavouras, is an assistant dean of graduate education and professor of nutrition at Arizona State University.

Here are a few words from him on the topic of underhydration.

The topic of hydration and health is new and under researched. At this point, we probably have more questions than answers and theories on potential mechanisms associating low water intake with various unexplored pathologies, including cancer and longevity. However, it is time to concentrate our efforts on the health implications of being a low-drinker rather than examining the acute effects of dehydration (water deficit). We need large scale studies and randomized control trials to investigate how increased water intake impacts health and well-being.

According to the Medical Subject Headings of the US National library of medicine “dehydration is the condition that results from excessive loss of water from a living organism.” Even though dehydration describes the state of body water deficit, some scientists have suggested that dehydration refers to the process of losing water, while hypohydration is the state of water deficit, and rehydration is the process of gaining water from a hypohydrated state towards euhydration.

The majority of research on water homeostasis and its effects on the human body has focused on how water deficit impacts exercise performance, mainly in hot environments.

Edward Adolf in his classic work “Physiology of Man in the Desert” was one of the first to study the effect of water intake on thermoregulation and performance. He also introduced the term voluntary dehydration when he observed that during “rapid sweating”, humans do not drink enough to maintain body water. He concluded that: “…when he is active and needs much water his thirst sensations are inadequate.”

During the last 30 years we have learned that even a mild degree of dehydration (< 2% of body weight) can impair exercise performance and increase heat strain, especially in the heat. The degree of exercise-induced dehydration often ranges between 2 and 5% of body weight and it is accompanied by elevated plasma osmolality, decreased plasma volume, and increased urinary biomarkers (i.e. urine osmolality).

Influenced by this observation and based on the mathematical symmetric property stating that if A = B, then B = A, we have mistakenly assumed that the backward association is also true. Thus, if exercise-induced dehydration leads to increased urine biomarkers, then elevated urinary biomarkers should correspond with water deficit and dehydration. So, when we read data indicating that a majority of children, adults, and athletes have elevated levels of urinary osmolality or specific gravity we mistakenly conclude that a large portion of the population is dehydrated. Furthermore, when we read data indicating that a majority of people across the world do not meet the dietary guidelines for water intake we also conclude that most people are dehydrated.

Is it possible that people with free access to water when they do not meet the water intake guidelines or when they have elevated urinary biomarkers are dehydrated? Probably not.


Kavouras, S.A. Hydration, dehydration, underhydration, optimal hydration: are we barking up the wrong tree?. Eur J Nutr 58, 471–473 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-018-01889-z


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